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09.26.2019 Sharon Spano, Ph.D.

The Power of Suggestion

I spend quite a bit of time listening to clients describe the obstacles they're up against in business and life. I'm trained to see what's working and what's not working. As one of my friends likes to say, Sharon sees things as they could be. 

My friend describes this ability as one of my gifts. I like that idea, but I also know that gifts can sometimes work against us if we're not careful.

This gift of "seeing" can sometimes get me into trouble because I process information rather quickly. 

Can you relate?

You're trained to see the dynamics around you. Systems, processes, people. All the multiple facets of your environment. You see what's working and what's not working. You see what needs to change in order to maximize results. 

You see. Then, you speak into what you're seeing.

As another friend reminded me the other day, timing is everything. I sometimes struggle with this idea of timing because I want what I see to be fully realized NOW.

This is when timing collides with the power of suggestion.

I make a suggestion and my timing is off (meaning the other person is not yet ready to hear what I see), so my suggestion could be perceived as negative. This in turn can result in self-doubt on the part of the listener—which actually shuts down any opportunity for effective change.

If, on the other hand, my timing creates space for the other person to lean into what I'm seeing, then my suggestion serves to encourage such that change is a natural result.

Self-awareness is a process. One that often stings. I hate when I stumble upon yet one more flaw in my character. Yet, I also know it's part of developmental growth. 

Better to feel the sting of self-awareness in one moment than to bear the life long burden of ignorance. 

Remember. Every moment of awareness is an opportunity for change. 

I invite you to explore your gifts and how those very same gifts might sometimes work against you. Just a suggestion. I leave the timing up to you.

Published by Sharon Spano, Ph.D. September 26, 2019