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08.11.2015 Sharon Spano, Ph.D.

How to Build a Powerful Master Mind Group

In order to build a powerful Master Mind group, you first have to understand the intent and purpose behind actually forming one. Few people do, and this is why Master Mind groups often fail.

If you’re thinking of starting a Master Mind group, here’s a few points you might want to consider:

Purpose of a Master Mind Group

First, it’s important to understand that the idea of a Master Mind group was initially formulated via the renowned work of Napoleon Hill. In his book Think and Grow Rich, Hill states that a MM group involves the “Coordination of knowledge and effort in a spirit of harmony between two or more people, for the attainment of a definite purpose.”

Often, that purpose involves the transformation of a known desire into monetary value. The point of the identified group is to come together, the key word being harmony, such that they offer up advice, counsel, and personal cooperation and commitment to one another (Hill, 1937).

Main Characteristics of a Master Mind Group

Yes, a MM group is economic in nature, but it is also psychic. Before you get all weird in the head about the word psychic, let’s dive into what Hill actually means by this.

“No two minds ever come together without creating a third, invisible, intangible force which may be likened to a third mind.”

This is because the mind is energy, and it’s spiritual in nature. If the idea of psychic energy is a disturbing notion to you, consider a quote from Jesus himself in Matthew 18:19-20:

“Again, I tell you that if two of you on earth agree about anything you ask for, it will be done for you by my Father in heaven. For where two or three come together in my name, there am I with them.”

In other words, when we come together for goodness, God is in the House.

Hill further adds: “When a group of individual brains are coordinated and function in harmony, the increased energy created through the alliance becomes available to every individual brain in the group.”

Awesome to consider, right?

Let’s look at some of the steps necessary to forming a powerful MM group—many of which are often over looked.

Identify Like-Minded Members

Your MM group doesn’t have to include people from the same industry or profession. In fact, the group will be richer if there is some diversity in the group.

What’s important, however, is that there’s some affinity among the members. For example, I belong to a group now that is comprised of very high-level thought leaders.

While we all have different businesses and backgrounds, we’re committed to earning more so that we can contribute to a better world. Additionally, our facilitator is a deeply spiritual man who is well versed in how to structure a safe environment in the midst of such diversity.

Being like-minded doesn’t mean we all think the same. What it means is that we are equally suited to explore bigger and better prospectives and to respect and learn from one another.

Create a Structure for the Group

The structure should be linked to the purpose of the group. For example, in our group, we’re all in business, so our structure includes time to explore perspectives on leadership. We have also each identified and shared very specific goals that we would like the rest of the group to encourage and support.

We have an exact start and stop time with a variety of exercises and topics that are systematically covered during our monthly sessions. In addition to our face-to-face meetings, we check in on-line once a week.

The structure allows us to connect with one another in deeper ways throughout the busyness of our lives. Each time we come together in our face-to-face meetings, we become more unified and committed to one another’s goals.

Ensure a Safe, Supportive Environment

In Hill’s exploration of over 500 of the world’s richest men, he found that harmony within the group was a key factor. It’s important, then, that the members be carefully selected and that the structure of the group offers up a safe and supportive environment.

Since the point of the group is to create opportunities for advice and counsel from a variety of perspectives, each member must feel safe and secure enough to seek advice on specific challenges.

No member of the group should be given unsolicited advice, made to feel as though they need to defend their position or ideas, or challenged in ways that are disruptive to the harmony of the group.

Master Mind groups have a variety of ways that this harmony is protected in the midst of solving key business/life challenges.

One way is for the group to create ground rules for how they will honor and respect one another. Confidentiality is another key factor.

The harmony and support required for a successful Master Mind group will strengthen and deepen over time if each member is made to feel safe enough to express innovative ideas and share information.

Seek Transformation Over Accountability

MM groups have an inherent element of accountability. To fully utilize the energy and highest potential of several minds, however, it’s important to consider processes that will allow for some level of personal and professional transformation.

Best business practices and the metrics of those practices are important, but they are only part of the process. It’s important, therefore, to seek out a good facilitator who has knowledge as to how a MM group works.

It’s equally important that your facilitator has the experience and wisdom to facilitate transformational opportunities as they arise within the group. This person should be skilled in group dynamics such that they know how to listen, speak, and facilitate the other members through the sticky stuff that naturally arises when two or more come together.

Remember, that a MM group is part economic and part psychic or spiritual. There is great power in diverse minds coming together in support of one another’s dreams and aspirations.

Pay attention to the structure of the group, how aligned the members are with one another, the level of trust and respect that arises from the onset, and how skilled your facilitator is in human dynamics.

Do these things and watch the magic unfold.

Published by Sharon Spano, Ph.D. August 11, 2015